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Senate pass bill to eliminate seasonal time changes in Wyoming

A vintage clock that has graced Grant Street Grocery for decades is on display in the renovated store. (Dan Cepeda, Oil City File)

CASPER, Wyo. — Wyoming is ticking closer to some changes to how clocks work in the state.

The Wyoming Senate passed a bill on third reading on Wednesday, March 11 which aims to eliminate the observance of seasonal time changes.

Since the Senate have adopted an amendment to the version of  House Bill 44 they received from the House of Representatives, the bill will return to the House for a concurrence vote before it could move to Governor Mark Gordon’s desk for consideration.

The Senate’s third reading vote was 17-11:

Ayes: ANDERSON, ANSELMI-DALTON, BALDWIN, BEBOUT, BITEMAN, BONER, BOUCHARD, CASE, COE, GIERAU, HICKS, JAMES, MONIZ, NETHERCOTT, ROTHFUSS, STEINMETZ, VON FLATERN
Nays: DOCKSTADER, ELLIS, HUTCHINGS, KINSKEY, KOST, LANDEN, PAPPAS, PERKINS, SCHULER, SCOTT, WASSERBURGER
Excused: AGAR, DRISKILL

Wyoming Legislative Service Office

The Senate’s amendment would allow Wyoming to stop observing seasonal time changes if three other “western states” pass similar legislation. Those states could include:

  • Colorado
  • Idaho
  • Montana
  • Nebraska
  • North Dakota
  • South Dakota
  • Utah

The Senate’s first reading amendment modified the bill in some other ways from the version they received from the Senate. The House version required that Montana, Idaho, Utah and Colorado pass similar legislation before Wyoming would eliminate seasonal time changes.

In addition to modifying which states could allow Wyoming to enact the changes, the Senate amendment would also require that the United States Congress enact legislation to authorize states to observe daylight savings time year round.

“The year-round observed time of the entire state of Wyoming and all of the state’s political subdivisions is mountain daylight time,” the amendment states. “Wyoming exempts all areas of the state from mountain standard time.”

If the provisions were all met, and the bill is signed into law, it would go into effect the first Sunday of November.

A similar piece of legislation stalled out during the Wyoming Legislature’s 2019 general session. That bill was passed by Wyoming’s House of Representatives but failed on two tie votes in the Senate.


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